CEE 6400 Physical Hydrology

Instructor

Professor Belize Lane

Catalog Information

Fundamentals of hydrologic cycle and hydrologic processes. Precipitation, infiltration, runoff generation, evaporation and transpiration, and snowmelt. Representation of hydrologic processes in hydrologic models.3 credits, Fall semester. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Hydrology (CEE 3430) or equivalent.
 

Course Canvas page: https://usu.instructure.com/courses/469078


Course Goals
To develop an understanding and appreciation of hydrology as a quantitative science describing the occurrence, distribution and movement of water at and near the surface of the earth. To develop a sound conceptual and quantitative understanding of the physical processes involved in the land phase of the hydrologic cycle. To learn how to apply this understanding to real-world hydrologic and engineering problems. To gain exposure to research problems and issues involving the physical understanding and parameterization of hydrologic processes.


Learning Objectives
• To retrieve and evaluate hydrologic data to support quantitative interpretation and description of the associated hydrologic processes (streamflow, precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, subsurface water).
• To quantitatively describe and evaluate the processes involved in the hydrologic cycle.
• To use key hydrologic principles, such as conservation of mass and energy, and other physical principles to quantify and model hydrologic processes.
• To apply and interpret the results from simple hydrologic models to examine questions and problems that hydrologists and water resource engineers may face.

Prerequisites
1. An undergraduate level understanding of hydrology from a course such as CEE3430
2. Physics. An understanding of forces, the laws of motion, and physical and thermal properties of matter (water, air, soil).
3. Mathematics. A strong background including calculus, linear algebra, statistics.
4. Computer literacy. An ability to use computers to process, analyze and plot data using appropriate software (e.g. spreadsheets or programming language).


Topics
1. Introduction, the hydrologic cycle, conservation laws, error assessment (Dingman, ch 1, 2).
2. Statistical methods in hydrology (Helsel and Hirsch 1992)
2. The climate system: radiation, energy balance, greenhouse effect, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). (Dingman, ch 3)
3. Meteorology of precipitation. (Dingman, ch 4 p94-105)
4. Precipitation data analysis, Measurement and areal averaging, Intensity-duration-frequency curves. (Dingman ch 4, p105-165)
5. Physical factors in runff generation (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 1-3; Dingman, ch 6)
6. Water in soil (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 4, Dingman, ch 6)
7. Infiltration (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 5, Dingman ch 9)
8. Digital elevation models and GIS in Hydrology (Research papers).
9. TOPMODEL and the role of topography and variable contributing areas in runoff generation (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 6; Beven et al., 1995).
10. Routing surface runoff to a basin outlet. Overland flow, channel routing, unit hydrographs and linear systems theory. (Dingman ch 9, Chow et al., ch 7 p213-223).
11. Evaporation. Energy input from solar radiation. Evapotranspiration physics and models (Dingman ch 7, Appendix E. Handbook of Hydrology ch 4).
12. Snow and snowmelt processes (Dingman ch 5).


Assigned textbook
Dingman, S. L., (2002), Physical Hydrology, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 646 p.


Supplementary reading

Tarboton, D. G., (2003), Rainfall Runoff Processes, Online module and workbook prepared for the National Weather Service COMET outreach program, http://www.engineering.usu.edu/dtarb/rrp.html.
Beven, K., R. Lamb, P. Quinn, R. Romanowicz and J. Freer, (1995), "TOPMODEL," in Computer Models of Watershed Hydrology, Edited by V. P. Singh, Water Resources Publications, Highlands Ranch, Colorado, p.627-668.
Bras, R. L., (1990), Hydrology, An introduction to hydrologic science, Addison Wesley, Reading, MA, 643 p. Chow, V. T., D. R. Maidment and L. W. Mays, (1988), Applied Hydrology, McGraw Hill, 572 p.
Helsel, D. R., & Hirsch, R. M. (1992). Statistical methods in water resources (Vol. 49). Elsevier. <https://pubs.usgs.gov/twri/twri4a3/pdf/twri4a3-new.pdf>
Loucks, D. P., E. van Beek, J. R. Stedinger, J. P. M. Dijkman and M. T. Villars, (2005), Water Resources Systems Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications, UNESCO, Paris, 676 p, http://hdl.handle.net/1813/2804
National Research Council Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences (COHS), (1991), Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences, Editor, P. S. Eagleson, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C, http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=1543.

CEE 6400 Physical Hydrology

Instructor

Professor Belize Lane

Catalog Information

Fundamentals of hydrologic cycle and hydrologic processes. Precipitation, infiltration, runoff generation, evaporation and transpiration, and snowmelt. Representation of hydrologic processes in hydrologic models.3 credits, Fall semester. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Hydrology (CEE 3430) or equivalent.
 

Course Canvas page: https://usu.instructure.com/courses/469078


Course Goals
To develop an understanding and appreciation of hydrology as a quantitative science describing the occurrence, distribution and movement of water at and near the surface of the earth. To develop a sound conceptual and quantitative understanding of the physical processes involved in the land phase of the hydrologic cycle. To learn how to apply this understanding to real-world hydrologic and engineering problems. To gain exposure to research problems and issues involving the physical understanding and parameterization of hydrologic processes.


Learning Objectives
• To retrieve and evaluate hydrologic data to support quantitative interpretation and description of the associated hydrologic processes (streamflow, precipitation, evaporation, infiltration, subsurface water).
• To quantitatively describe and evaluate the processes involved in the hydrologic cycle.
• To use key hydrologic principles, such as conservation of mass and energy, and other physical principles to quantify and model hydrologic processes.
• To apply and interpret the results from simple hydrologic models to examine questions and problems that hydrologists and water resource engineers may face.

Prerequisites
1. An undergraduate level understanding of hydrology from a course such as CEE3430
2. Physics. An understanding of forces, the laws of motion, and physical and thermal properties of matter (water, air, soil).
3. Mathematics. A strong background including calculus, linear algebra, statistics.
4. Computer literacy. An ability to use computers to process, analyze and plot data using appropriate software (e.g. spreadsheets or programming language).


Topics
1. Introduction, the hydrologic cycle, conservation laws, error assessment (Dingman, ch 1, 2).
2. Statistical methods in hydrology (Helsel and Hirsch 1992)
2. The climate system: radiation, energy balance, greenhouse effect, El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). (Dingman, ch 3)
3. Meteorology of precipitation. (Dingman, ch 4 p94-105)
4. Precipitation data analysis, Measurement and areal averaging, Intensity-duration-frequency curves. (Dingman ch 4, p105-165)
5. Physical factors in runff generation (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 1-3; Dingman, ch 6)
6. Water in soil (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 4, Dingman, ch 6)
7. Infiltration (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 5, Dingman ch 9)
8. Digital elevation models and GIS in Hydrology (Research papers).
9. TOPMODEL and the role of topography and variable contributing areas in runoff generation (Tarboton, 2003 online module ch 6; Beven et al., 1995).
10. Routing surface runoff to a basin outlet. Overland flow, channel routing, unit hydrographs and linear systems theory. (Dingman ch 9, Chow et al., ch 7 p213-223).
11. Evaporation. Energy input from solar radiation. Evapotranspiration physics and models (Dingman ch 7, Appendix E. Handbook of Hydrology ch 4).
12. Snow and snowmelt processes (Dingman ch 5).


Assigned textbook
Dingman, S. L., (2002), Physical Hydrology, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 646 p.


Supplementary reading

Tarboton, D. G., (2003), Rainfall Runoff Processes, Online module and workbook prepared for the National Weather Service COMET outreach program, http://www.engineering.usu.edu/dtarb/rrp.html.
Beven, K., R. Lamb, P. Quinn, R. Romanowicz and J. Freer, (1995), "TOPMODEL," in Computer Models of Watershed Hydrology, Edited by V. P. Singh, Water Resources Publications, Highlands Ranch, Colorado, p.627-668.
Bras, R. L., (1990), Hydrology, An introduction to hydrologic science, Addison Wesley, Reading, MA, 643 p. Chow, V. T., D. R. Maidment and L. W. Mays, (1988), Applied Hydrology, McGraw Hill, 572 p.
Helsel, D. R., & Hirsch, R. M. (1992). Statistical methods in water resources (Vol. 49). Elsevier. <https://pubs.usgs.gov/twri/twri4a3/pdf/twri4a3-new.pdf>
Loucks, D. P., E. van Beek, J. R. Stedinger, J. P. M. Dijkman and M. T. Villars, (2005), Water Resources Systems Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications, UNESCO, Paris, 676 p, http://hdl.handle.net/1813/2804
National Research Council Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences (COHS), (1991), Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences, Editor, P. S. Eagleson, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C, http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=1543.

Overview: This emphasis encompasses a broad range of interdisciplinary topics related to fluvial systems, including ecohydraulics, river mechanics, river engineering, surface water quality, physical hydrology, and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Students in this specialization can design a graduate program to match their individual goals and interests, including both traditional study areas such as hydraulic engineering and applied interdisciplinary research areas related to river restoration and natural systems modeling. Students can supplement department offerings with courses in Watershed Sciences, Geology, Statistics, and other areas to build both the fundamental understanding and breadth of knowledge to solve the pressing challenges in river science and management.

Areas of current student research include: physical-ecological linkages in fluvial systems, surface water – groundwater interactions, water temperature modeling in natural systems, environmental flows, sedimentation processes and fluvial geomorphology.

NEW graduate emphasis in River Mechanics and Modeling 

© 2019 by Belize A. Lane